Topic: Another New One by McNeil

Well, does everyone have their boots on (hip boots) here we go again.  The latest and “greatest” (????) from McNeil Nutritionals LLC, the makers of Splenda.  Drum roll please,,,,,,,,  Nectresse, sounds kind of French doesn’t it, makes it sound rather pretty.  Made from real fruit, right.  A melon, monk fruit, has an extract that is 150 times sweeter than sugar.

http://www.delish.com/food/recalls-revi … -sweetener


The Monk Fruit site http://www.monkfruit.org/   does not indicate that it can be “eaten” as a fruit or melon but used as a liquid sweetener perhaps in a smoothie or tea blend.  Never heard of it before today and will ask in local groceries to see if it is available.  Sounds like it may only be available from China at this time it is a subtropical fruit but not tolerant to sun light, per Wikipedia.  And our own FDA does state that it is GRAS (generally recognized as safe), ain’t that woooonerful.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monk_fruit

In any case by the time McNeil is through with it I don’t believe it would be GRAS any longer.

PatB

Re: Another New One by McNeil

http://www.nectresse.com/faq 

Does NECTRESSE™ Natural No Calorie Sweetener really have zero calories?

Monk Fruit Extract is about 150X sweeter than sugar and contributes zero calories per serving to NECTRESSE™ Natural No Calorie Sweetener. Like other no-calorie sweeteners, NECTRESSE™ Sweetener contains a small amount of carbohydrate (1-2 grams per serving) from other food ingredients to provide needed volume and texture. These food ingredients, which include small amounts of erythritol, sugar, and molasses, contribute so few calories per serving that NECTRESSE™ Natural No Calorie Sweetener Products meet the FDA’s criteria for no-calorie foods (<5 calories/serving).

Gee, “provide needed volume and texture”, (more buck for the bang).  The suggested usage is a quarter teaspoon full for one serving but the original is supposed to be 150 times more sweet than sugar alone, what is the need to add sugar AND molasses in as well except to get more volume being more money.

What is erythritol?

Erythritol is an all-natural, sugar alcohol that is naturally fermented from sugars and is found in many vegetables and fruits. Erythritol contributes zero calories per serving of NECTRESSE™ Sweetener. This natural sweetener has been used for over a decade. Consuming erythritol from NECTRESSE™ Sweetener is not expected to result in laxative or other gastrointestinal effects that are known to sometimes occur with other sugar alcohols.

Dr. Hull has talked frequently about the use of sugar alcohols indicating that they can cause adverse conditions to various individuals with erythritol being the least of any causes.  She also states that one should use caution when using these alcohols for sweeteners and best to stay with only natural unadulterated sweeteners.

The Monk Fruit site shows some mothers sitting around discussing the fruit with a glass of the prepared concentrate in front of each woman.  The glass contains a cream colored liquid.  The Nectresse site shows the picture of the box with a snow white content.  From my understanding of obtaining a white powder there is a “bleaching” procedure involved that takes all elements from the natural element.  My point is “what has been done to the Monk Fruit concentrate to get to the “white stage”.  Also normally molasses is not white either.  By the time the end product has gotten to the shelves of America what has been done to the “all natural sweeteners”?????

Interested in where to buy the concentrate, type in the Google Search “where to buy monk fruit concentrate” and many places in the USA will pop up.

Interesting reading:  http://www.nutritionaloutlook.com/artic … uit-2-7757

PatB

Re: Another New One by McNeil

Very interesting, PatB, and you have done your research. Your basic point, which is also my basic point - why manufacture the natural sugars in the first place, changing their natural forms and removing the natural sugars from their matrix (the Monk Fruit, the pineapple, the corn, etc), then adding anti-caking agents, a little refining here and some <5% additives there that don't have to be labeled.... Hum, why not just NOT add any extra sugars to anything because if you eat natural foods that are naturally sweet, you don't need to add sweetness????

This means not eating candy bars, desserts, or prepackaged cereals shaped like donuts or little stick figures; this means not drinking colas and power drinks colored purple; this means not chewing gum (they all have chemical sweeteners in them these days). Adults might be able to break these bad habits, but the kids today???? They are going to have serious withdrawals from all the junk they eat and drink. 

Another "new natural" sweetener from McNeil? I wouldn't consider this healthy by any means - just another money making scheme. Just another attempt to dominate this mega billion dollar market.