Topic: vitamin k

Does lacking of vitamin k causes clotting of the blood and internal bleeding? What are some food or supplements that is high in vitamin k?

Re: vitamin k

Hi there!

Just a quick search in google returned some of the following info:

Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Without the vitamin, even a small cut would cause continuous bleeding in the body because proteins assemble in the blood stream and form the blood clot. These proteins require vitamin K for their synthesis. The blood-clotting process also requires a dozen other proteins that do not need vitamin K for their synthesis.

Foods such as spinach, cabbage, brussels sprouts, and eggs contain vitamin k. Soybean oil, canola oil, and olive oil are good sources of the vitamin, while corn oil and peanut oil are poor sources.

You can read more about vitamin k here.

- Andy

Re: vitamin k

asmith wrote:

eggs contain vitamin k

I guess I'm going to like eggs now.
Thank you Andy for the information and to the link.

Re: vitamin k

Hi. I am curious about just anything, and as I recently has become interested in the orthomolecular approach to medicine, aswell as coconut oil and vitamin C, I googled for "coconut and vitamin C", and subsequently found this website. I also found another website, found here:
http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=1117162007
and these two websites, put together with the opportunity of asking Dr. Hull a question on this messageboard, led me to formulate this question:
Dr. Janet Hull

Re: vitamin k

Hey Michael,

Thanks for your question. I will see what Dr. Hull has to say and get back with ya!

Best,

- Andy

Re: vitamin k

asmith, thanks for the vitamin K answer. I can't top that.

Michael, in todays world, vitamins take on different "marketing" names, and there are so many different varieties of vitamins that we never had before, such as the many different forms of calcium, and vitamin G is now known as riboflavin. I typically refer to vitamin C as vitamin C from ascorbic acid. In my line of work working with the general public, to merely refer to vitamin C as just ascorbic acid, I would lose my audience. So, when referring to vitamin C these days, it gets the point across more effeciently to refer to vitamin C as "vitamin C as ascorbic acid."

I spoke at a conference in London a couple of years ago, and one of the guest speakers was a Linus Pauling expert. He also referred to vitamin C this way, but was a proponent of using ascorbic acid as the source of the vitamin.

I hope this answers your question.

7

Re: vitamin k

Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin, so it is stored in the body's fat tissue and liver.Vitamin K absence is actual rare. It occurs if the physique can't appropriately absorb the vitamin from the abdominal tract. Vitamin K absence can as well action afterwards long-term treatment with antibiotics.

Re: vitamin k

Thanks for the post - very good.

Re: vitamin k

Very cool, general. Many thanks from our readers for the post!

Re: vitamin k

Nice list, general. This makes it easier to keep vitamin K rich foods in the pantry.